Atropine Eye Drops (For Your Keeeeds?)

Listen to your wholyness, the eyeguru. Atropine is one of the actual dumbest ideas spouted by lens-sellers, in all of modern dumb ideas in lens-seller-ey. And that's saying a lot.

Jake Steiner

Aug 31,2020 · 3 min read

All right, kittehz.

Especially if you’re new here and researching atropine, you’re in for a treat.  Strap in, cause you’re about to get your hair blown back, proper.

As a means of quick introduction, this post is written by me, Jake Steiner, resident heretic and beardly sage of all eyesight wisdoms.  Most humbly speaking, there is no other living eyeguru left on planet earth who can tell you more about healthy human eyesight, and the endless schemes and machinations to deprive you of it.  

I’ve helped tens of thousands go ask questions, find answers, and rid themselves of lens subscriptions over the last couple of decades.  

But that, neither here nor there.  Let’s talk atropine.

The question being, should you give your child atropine drops, because your “eye doctor” said so.  Because your child has some mysterious genetic condition that causes poor eyesight, and putting paralyzing poison drops in their eyes, will slow this mysterious genetic malfeasance.  

Temporarily, anyway.  As long as you keep using the drops.

That sounds like a swell idea already, just by the brief summary.  How you wouldn’t just go for that without asking questions, I don’t know.

Basics about how atropine works (<–).

And some study on the effectiveness of atropine drops for myopia control.

I always recommend that you visit Google Scholar (scholar.google.com) whenever some symptom treatment “medical” authority wants to give you some take-this-pill-and-go-away-now solution, without addressing causes.

You want to look at clinical research, at the very least glance at some of it, before going down the road of eye-paralyzing poison drops for your child.

Also and why even mention it, your child will get sensitive to light, because shock and surprise, atropine stops your child’s pupils from working correctly.  So your child won’t like to go outside to play which would actually be what you want, to stop the myopia progression.

But I digress.

But I don’t digress even a little, actually:

If you enjoy these sorts of contents, there is the whole Daily Beard playlist.

And if you want to know more about child myopia and are willing to dig in a bit, check out the child myopia section of this darling Website.

Myopia is a scheme.  A ruse, as it were.  A 100 billion dollar a year profit narrative.

Don’t get your kids into glasses.  iPads aren’t babysitters.  Outside, still the old-timey and correct answer.  For more and starting points to learn about natural myopia control, check out the child myopia wiki article.

Cheers,

-Jake

WRITTEN BY

Jake Steiner

Reformed stock trader. Kite surfer, pilot, vagabond. Father. And of course - the last of the living, imaginarily bearded eye gurus.

Topic:  Child Myopia

Child Myopia