Jon & High Myopia: A Very Detailed Progress Report

If you have fairly high myopia and are wondering what good progress might look like, there are some posts you will want to check out in the forum.  Jon reports: Short version:– I did big […]

Jake Steiner

Mar 16,2015 · 1 min read

If you have fairly high myopia and are wondering what good progress might look like, there are some posts you will want to check out in the forum.  Jon reports:

Short version:
– I did big jumps through the initial ciliary relaxation phase, and while figuring out optimal Rx’s.
– Once I had a good distance and good close up pair, and after that initial ciliary relaxation jump, .25 increments seem to work better for me (I took a roundabout way to get to that conclusion, detailed below.).
– If I hit a plateau, I seem to be finding that pushing the Rx slightly more helps.

I am generally in slight (but comfortable) / edge of blur (with the respective Rx for the task at hand, and lighting / time of day) all day. If I feel like it’s too much or I’m tired, I’ll break (in addition to normal breaks looking at different distances) and up the Rx a little for the rest of the day.

Detailed version:
(first number is right eye below)
8/28/14 and prior: -7.75/-8 (Last Rx from the eye doc and consistent for 2 years.) Reading at the 20/20 line with these on 8/18. A few letters of  …

[read on]

Jon’s detailed update reflects what you should experience.  Initial quick adjustment (some part overprescription usually, and some part less focusing muscle spasm), and then ongoing gradual improvement.  The more you follow Alex’ recommendations and stay involved in the beginning, the more reliably you will see ongoing progress in the long run.

An aside, for those of you wondering what may have gotten into Jake in this recent article.

I’m sure sometime soon we will get something talking more about axial change.  A fair bit of e-mail has come in with people really worried!  You do have to read between the lines sometimes with Jake.  Of course axial change is real – it’s a rather interesting subject, with plenty of conjecture.  To fully appreciate the subject one may have to read a fair bit to get a sense of who the authors of various studies are, their background, and goals.  

If you are just thinking of your eyes though, rest assured, your eyes are indeed a dynamic system.  They do adjust to prevalent focal plane, including one of the core mechanisms for that purpose, the length of the eyeball.  If that were not the case, you wouldn’t be able to improve much of your eyesight (and there are lots of first hand accounts to the contrary, here).

Hopefully Jake will provide us with more good reading on the axial change front, soon.  :-)

WRITTEN BY

Jake Steiner

Reformed stock trader. Kite surfer, pilot, vagabond. Father. And of course - the last of the living, imaginarily bearded eye gurus.

Topic:  Student Reviews

First Hand Experiences.