Lower Diopters Don’t Improve Eyesight

So here is a vaguely common and recurring problem.  With some newbies to endmyopia. They read, browse, see all kinds of talk about[...]

Jake Steiner

Feb 25,2019 · 2 min read

So here is a vaguely common and recurring problem.  With some newbies to endmyopia.

They read, browse, see all kinds of talk about reduced diopters.  So they think, hey that’s great.  Less diopters equals improving eyesight.  Got it.  Going to reduce my diopters.

Because everything in modern life has to be a quick answer-shortcut.

Only takes a couple hours of reading to fully understand vision biology and myopia causes and also plzz-give-me-da-steps-bro.

Or of course it could be a Jake’s fault, not spending enough time explaining that it’s resulting stimulus potential that may improve your eyesight, and not the diopter reduction.  Think it all the way through, don’t stop at the part that comes before having to put in some personal effort.

A quick video rant, further explaining the difference between less diopters and constructive stimulus:

Calm and composed.  As always.

It takes a toll on a beardly sage, the never ending volume of ever repeating questions.  

If only we had an FAQ.  If only someone would invent a search function.  If only it was easier to take some initiative and look around, before firing up the e-mail and sending Jake yet another “so hey I just found your site and threw away my glasses and now I can’t see anything.

FML.

Or, if we’ll take a positive spin, the neuron-disadvantaged inspired a video further explaining the difference between diopters and stimulus.

Go make some 20/20 gains, darlings.

Cheers,

-Jake

WRITTEN BY

Jake Steiner

Reformed stock trader. Kite surfer, pilot, vagabond. Father. And of course - the last of the living, imaginarily bearded eye gurus.

Topic:  Glasses

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