Sticky Note: Timing Diopter Equalizing

Today, not so much a casual reader post (apologies!). I need to put this one somewhere though, so it’s easy to find and I can refer back to it when students ask about equalizing prescriptions. […]

Jake Steiner

Nov 30,2015 · 2 min read

Today, not so much a casual reader post (apologies!).

I need to put this one somewhere though, so it’s easy to find and I can refer back to it when students ask about equalizing prescriptions.

Equalizing:  Reducing the difference between left and right eye diopters.

Goal:  Reducing prescription complexity.

Benefit:  Far easier transition between lenses and no lenses.  Once fully equalized the only difference between corrected and natural vision is one focal plane for both eyes.  Happier visual cortex, better perceived natural vision, and easier managing ongoing reductions in prescriptions.

Process:  Much discussed in BackTo20/20.  Important to take it slow, focus on simple bifocal reductions first, consider equalizing as more of a detail piece of the puzzle.  More notes on that, per a note I just made in the forum.

Don’t mess around with this, until you’re well into successfully reducing your bifocal, spherical correction.  As much as reducing prescription complexity has many benefits, it’s definitely not a beginner topic.

For equalizing, keep an eye on your centimeter / Snellen. Any persistent small change in the ratio there is a good indication for when it’s time to make an adjustment.

In general, I like to start with equal spherical reductions first. Then when there’s a good habit base and improvements, take one reduction to do a bit of equalizing. Next reduction go back to equal reductions. Let that settle (Snellen go back up), then consider another 0.25 of equalizing. Often I’ll do two spherical reductions at least (or more for high myopes) for one equalizing reduction. Just to give you an idea of general timing.

Specifically though, depends on each individual. When the eyes have caught up to the correction change, it’s always possible to continue with equalizing.

As always, a supportive optometrist can be a great asset in helping you explore lens changes.  Having a nice office set up with lenses, eye charts, and the option to take care of cutting your new lenses is always worth considering.

You will probably end up with me on the discussion of when/how/how much, either way.  But if you get the opportunity to add local support, great bonus!

Cheers,

-Jake

WRITTEN BY

Jake Steiner

Reformed stock trader. Kite surfer, pilot, vagabond. Father. And of course - the last of the living, imaginarily bearded eye gurus.

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