Vision Improvement: Recognize Opportunity

Let’s look at a recent question in the forum: At school I wear full prescription contacts for 7 hours. Up close and far away I use them. I know this is bad but I usually […]

Jake Steiner

Sep 29,2013 · 3 min read

Let’s look at a recent question in the forum:

At school I wear full prescription contacts for 7 hours. Up close and far away I use them. I know this is bad but I usually make up for it by pulling focus and reading all those cheesy signs teachers put up the classroom.

So when I come back from school My vision would be what I imagine below 50cm because I was using them with contacts for up close and afar. No, this is not the case. My vision goes up to 55-60cm. Now, this is the time for me when the sun is at it’s highest point and is shining brightly, and when I do CM measurements, I always pull up my curtains. So, why do I get an increase every time when I come back from school?

The full thread, including my response, is here:  https://endmyopia.org/myopia-forums/topic/how-does-this-happen/

There is something here though, that applies to all of us:

First, the importance of keeping a log. A log will tell you exactly how different parts of your lifestyle impact your eyesight. If you are not living under single prescription paradigm (using just one prescription for everything, at the highest possible correction), you know that your eyesight is quite variable, and affected by everything from lighting conditions to close-up eye strain.

The Vision Improvement Courses provide a great foundation to help improve your eyesight. I recommend following the suggestions closely, for the duration of the course. Past that, however, you want to look back at your log, and define where you see the most gains.

The program has to make a number of concessions, to work for a wide audience, with very different circumstances. This means, a lot of compromises have to be made.

In one-on-one, and also your practices after the core program, you want to look at how your individual lifestyle may best benefit from the practices you learned in the program. If you have time to work more with distance, and you see greater results, you should focus on that. You may not need much stimulus during close-up work, if you find that it is less effective for you, than the distance work. Likewise, for others it may be a matter of environment, changing recreational activities, or addressing prescription use for their own improvement experience.

So at first, avoid experimenting. Follow the program. It is 40 years of best practices, and is the best starting point. Once you have this as a baseline, substantiated by your own log, start focusing on what brings you the most significant improvements.

Enjoy!

Alex discussing myopic child

WRITTEN BY

Jake Steiner

Reformed stock trader. Kite surfer, pilot, vagabond. Father. And of course - the last of the living, imaginarily bearded eye gurus.

Topic:  How To's

How To's